Tag Archives: jenkins

Continuous delivery – The simplest possible build pipeline for an integration scenario

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Sometimes a continuous integration/delivery scenario is more complex than just building a system in a multi-stage pipeline. The system may consist of several subsystems, or just complex components, each of which requires a build pipeline of their own. Once all systems pass through their respective build pipelines they are integrated together and subjected to a joint deployment and further testing. When facing such a scenario, I decided to build the simplest possible thing that would work and get the job done.

Two converging build pipelines

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Stop the line song

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I ended my talk on the SoapUI user gathering MeetUI singing the stop the line song. Now it has ended up on youtube.

Here’s the text:

I keep a close watch on these tests of mine
I keep my Jenkins open all the time
I see a defect coming down the line
Becuse you’re mine, I stop the line

Always Fix Broken Windows

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I keep a close watch on these tests of mine
I keep my Jenkins open all the time
I see a defect coming down the line
Because you’re mine, I stop the line

A zero bug policy is the only valid way to look at quality, just like there should never be any broken windows in your neighbourhood. Here is the third part of my three-part series on building the quality in on the SmartBear blog.

Think of old bicycles in cities. A bike is left tied up on the sidewalk for a while. Someone steals the ringing bell. Left in that shape in the same place for long enough the bike will magically fall apart, as if rotting.

In 1982, the social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling formulated a sociological theory from observations like these called “The Broken Windows.” A landscape, they meant, signals the type of social norms prevalent in the local society. A broken window left broken says: “it’s okay to break windows.” A broken bicycle sends the same signal.

Read the rest of the blog at SmartBear.