Tag Archives: stop-the-line

Stop-the-line spoken word performance

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Agila Sverige 2012 höll jag min första ignite i form av en Majakovski- och Bob Dylan-inspirerad Spoken World performance om hur vi på Polopoly skapade kvalitet genom extremt fokus på automatiserade tester och en stoppa-bandet-kultur.

Förra veckan fyllde konsultbolaget Adaptiv 5 år och firade genom att låte en utvald skara Agila Sverige-talare reprisera sina alster. Jag fick äran att stå för en liten del av middagsunderhållingen. Här är uppläsningen:

A bug is just an unwritten test that failed

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In the first week of March I attended two Spotify unconferences about Continuous Deliver and Quality (which I also had the pleasure to facilitate). I am amazed on how many we were (people had flown in from a lot of other places), the energy in the room, the quality of the discussions, and the massive number of practical initiatives that where suggested and started.

One reoccurring theme was the importance of a stop-the-line culture and what that actually means. I have to admit I was quite active in those discussion, and also held a short lightning talk about the broken windows syndrome. My this simple formula when it comes to bugs is this:

  • You write tests to create a product without defects
  • When a test fails you fix the underlying problem
  • A bug found outside testing is just an unwritten test that would have failed
  • Failing tests are always fixed
  • Therefore: a zero bug policy is the only thing that works in the long run
  • Otherwise you will suffer the broken windows system
  • Just do it
  • Now

Here’s my slides:

Always Fix Broken Windows

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I keep a close watch on these tests of mine
I keep my Jenkins open all the time
I see a defect coming down the line
Because you’re mine, I stop the line

A zero bug policy is the only valid way to look at quality, just like there should never be any broken windows in your neighbourhood. Here is the third part of my three-part series on building the quality in on the SmartBear blog.

Think of old bicycles in cities. A bike is left tied up on the sidewalk for a while. Someone steals the ringing bell. Left in that shape in the same place for long enough the bike will magically fall apart, as if rotting.

In 1982, the social scientists James Q. Wilson and George L. Kelling formulated a sociological theory from observations like these called “The Broken Windows.” A landscape, they meant, signals the type of social norms prevalent in the local society. A broken window left broken says: “it’s okay to break windows.” A broken bicycle sends the same signal.

Read the rest of the blog at SmartBear.