Tag Archives: bugs

Fix it now or delete it!

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A flow chart showing the two paths to dealing with a bug. If you "should fix it" you proceed to "will we prioritize it" if not you proceed to "delete it". If you're going to prioritize it you get to "fix it now" otherwise you proceed to "delete it"

“Fix It Now or Delete It” is a simple method that gives you two options for dealing with a bug: Fix It Now, or Delete It! I wrote a blog entry about this method a few months ago, and now there are lots of resources to help you talk to your team about simplifying the way you deal with bugs.

As part of the preparations for the lightning talk I gave last week at Agila Sverige, I created an info-graphic, cards, a mobile app (thanks to Daniel Sundman for implementing it in react-native) for iOS and Android, and a website. There’s even a t-shirt or two.

I hope that these resources will help you and your team in your journey to a successful zero-bug policy!

ps Yes, I realize this was going overboard for a 10 minute talk, but I hope you enjoy it 🙂 There’s also a little picture book in the making.

Stop Managing Bugs, Start Focusing on Quality!

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Do you have a long list of bugs? You definitely want to have a zero bug policy, but now you have all sorts of minors, majors, and criticals. You’re not really sure how to get to zero bugs (were you ever there to begin with?). You have spikes where you fix the bugs and your graphs show a steep downward drop, only for them to turn upwards again and reach new heights. Just maintaining the list of bugs is a full time job! To add insult to injury, when a team member finally gets around to looking at a bug, they usually find that it’s outdated, not reproducible or part of some long forgotten removed functionality.

There has to be a better way! How can you shift the focus from managing bugs to ensuring quality? Here’s a system that’s easy to start using, and rewarding when you follow it. read more »

Too small for a user story – bugs, fixes and support

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Some things are too small for the overhead of a user story, still they must be handled during the sprint effectively. I suggest a small taxonomy to classify them and also what to do with them.

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A bug is just an unwritten test that failed

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In the first week of March I attended two Spotify unconferences about Continuous Deliver and Quality (which I also had the pleasure to facilitate). I am amazed on how many we were (people had flown in from a lot of other places), the energy in the room, the quality of the discussions, and the massive number of practical initiatives that where suggested and started.

One reoccurring theme was the importance of a stop-the-line culture and what that actually means. I have to admit I was quite active in those discussion, and also held a short lightning talk about the broken windows syndrome. My this simple formula when it comes to bugs is this:

  • You write tests to create a product without defects
  • When a test fails you fix the underlying problem
  • A bug found outside testing is just an unwritten test that would have failed
  • Failing tests are always fixed
  • Therefore: a zero bug policy is the only thing that works in the long run
  • Otherwise you will suffer the broken windows system
  • Just do it
  • Now

Here’s my slides: