Riding a backwards bicycle – Keynote at Agile Islands 2016

The Agile ambition at Åland (a group of Islands between Sweden and Finland) is quite astonishing.  Besides being home to a bunch of cutting edge tech companies (who have been using Agile at Scale for 8+ years), they are also experimenting with using Agile in their society. Hm, Sweden suddenly feels sooo 90’s..

I had the privilege to keynote at their first Agile conference – Agile Islands 2016.  I wanted to bring something extra, so I brought with me a backwards bicycle in order to demonstrate how hard it is to adapt to changing conditions, even though we intellectually understand what we need to do.

(conversation in Swedish, with the instructions “use the pedals” and “pick up some speeed”. Yep they speak swedish in Åland)

The Black Phantom II

2016-09-06-10-18-232016-09-06-10-17-46

I you would like the slides from the presentation, they can be downloaded here.

Cheers

Mattias

Så vill jag förbättra offentlig upphandling inom LOU så att nyttan blir målet – välkommen på inspirationsdag!

Talare och arrangörer av ACPN 2016

Den här posten är tidigare publicerad på Linked In.

Mitt “WHY” är att jag drivs av att möjliggöra förändring och förbättring hos organisationer, team, individer och produkter. Därför blev jag Crispare för snart 5 år sedan. Nu kan jag sedan 2014 även lägga till att jag drivs av att förändra Sverige. I alla fall hur offentlig upphandling inom LOU görs, och hur man beställer komplexa lösningar.

Dåliga upphandlingar har vi nog alla drabbats av, eller kanske även varit inblandade i. Som leverantörer med beställningar gjorda utan kontext eller tydliga mål, i verksamheten med krav på oss att “fånga alla kraven”, på den interna utvecklingsavdelningen med att försöka få ihop ngt fungerande – eller som privatpersoner i vår vardag. Varför kan vi inte applicera ett Agilt arbetssätt tänkte vi för att förbättra även detta? Och så var det lilla “förändringsprojektet” startat 🙂
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What is an unconference?

Curious about unconferences? Perhaps you’re thinking of running one? Or maybe you are invited to an unconference or open space, and the organizer sent you this link to describe how it works? If so you’re in the right place! 

This doc is a high-level summary. For more details and facilitation instructions, see the ebook How to run an internal unconference.

What is an unconference?

An unconference is basically a conference without predefined topics. There is a high level structure and theme, but actual topics are generated by the participants on the spot, and breakout groups are formed dynamically based on interest and relevance.

If you know what an Open Space is, an unconference is really just an Open Space event with some added structure at the end to make it fit for company-internal events.

This is a pretty awesome format for cases where you want a super-flexible and participant-driven agenda and structure. I’ve been using it for years at Crisp, Spotify, Lego, and other clients, and it tends to spread virally within organizations. I’ve done it mostly with groups of 20-80 people, and people often say things like “all conferences should be like this” or “best conference I’ve ever been to!”

Facilitators opening the circle and introducing the format

Facilitators opening the circle and introducing the format

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X-team Silos Game – getting in T-shape

Cross functional teams are complete in expertise but not necessarily collaborative. Sometimes team members hold on to their expertise too much and the team does not perform to its potential. This Lego game illuminates the difference when members allow themselves to take on tasks outside their expertise, being so called T-shaped. Play the game to kick-start your change and create collaboration.

Playing the game.

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Alignment at Scale – slides from my Agile Africa keynote

Here are the slides from my Agile Africa keynote Alignment at Scale (or How to Not become Totally Unagile when you have Lots of Teams). Thanks for a great conference!

And thanks everyone for the Emma greeting, that sure made an 8 year girl very happy 🙂

(Emma was supposed to join me on this trip, but couldn’t make it because I had missed some required paperwork for travelling with minors to South Africa).

Agile Alignment at Scale

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Introducing Lottie Knutson – speaker at Fastfeedback 2016

lottie-knutson

During extraordinary situations and crises, some people stand out and shine. One of these was Lottie Knutson. Lottie led the Crisis team at Fritidsresor during the Tsunami disaster in 2004. While governments were struggling to figure out what had happened, Lottie’s team was already hitting the ground running.

Lottie will be speaking at Fast Feedback 2016, in Stockholm on Sept 21st-22nd. She will be sharing her insights and experience on how to prepare a leadership team for uncertain and critical events. We got a chance to talk with her.

 

What are you active in right now?

The fall has just started with board meetings and travel. I’ve decided to eat more greens (vegetables) and to do more walking. For the walking, my new favorite app, BBC World News, will come in handy.

What will your seminar at Fast Feedback 2016 focus on?

Lessons learned from quick change and dealing with crises at work.

You were quite active during the tsunami disaster and your leadership inspired many. What were the lessons learned from that?

The importance of being unpretentious, and how not to be fazed by the constant battle with internal bureaucracy and politics.

Thanks Lottie! Looking forward to seeing you at Fast Feedback.

 

10 kanban boards and their context updated – v1.5

Hi!

I’ve updated the  Kanban boards  collection with examples from departements outside IT, Product portfolio and Corporate Legal.

10_kanban_boards_portfolio

Spotify Rhythm – how we get aligned (slides from my talk at Agile Sverige)

Here are the slides from my talk about Spotify Rhythm at Agila Sverige.

The talk is about Spotify’s current approach to getting aligned as a company. It covers:

  • what problem we’re trying to solve, and how we’ve gone through two other models (OKR and Priorities & Achievements) before arriving at our current model
  • how we define “Bets” using the DIBB framework (Data-Insight-Belief-Bet)
  • how we prioritize bets using stack-ranking based on company beliefs and north star goals
  • how we visualize bets on a kanban-like company level board, and group them into Now – Next – Later columns
  • how different parts of the company visualize their own bets and align with higher level bets, using interlinked bet boards.
  • how we synchronize and prioritize our work using different cadences at different levels of the company.
  • how this model is used to support squad autonomy
  • our challenges and learnings with this so far

Holy crap how did I manage to cover all that in 10 minutes?! Guess I talked fast 🙂

Some sample slides below.

RIP OKR

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Misalignment

Misalignment

SAFe @ LEGO – Video from LKCE 2015

Hi!

Here’s the video of our presentation  “Learnings from SAFe @ LEGO” at LKCE 2015.

 

psst: Meet LEGO f2f at this years Fastfeedback conference 2016 (Stockholm, Sept 21-22:nd). This years focus topic is “Strategy – Turning insight to action”.

 

Cheers

Mattias

More with LeSS: The Third Large-Scale Scrum Book

Based on the experiences with clients adopting Large-Scale Scrum, from 2007 to 2009 Bas Vodde and I wrote the first two books on LeSS:

  1. Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Thinking and Organizational Tools for Large-Scale Scrum
  2. Practices for Scaling Lean & Agile Development: Large, Multisite, and Offshore Product Development with Large-Scale Scrum

These are a collection of experiments related to Large-Scale Scrum, organized into three major sections: experiments in thinking tools, organizational tools, and action (practice or technique) tools.

And now, almost a decade after starting our first book on scaling agile development, comes our third book: Large-Scale Scrum: More with LeSS.

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Slides from “Agile at scale”

Here are the slides from our evening event Agile at scale that took place at Crisp on May 11th.

Thanks everyone who attended for making this a great evening event!

Insights from Nordics first Agile contracting conference

acpn_drawing

OK, technically speaking, it was called a networking day.  But that wouldn’t do justice to the content here.

The main thing we got out of the ACPN Agile contracting conference was the three different perspectives from lawyers, customers and providers.  That gave us a unique insight into the challenges and questions from each party.

Some cool facts:

  • Founders of both the Danish Agile contract (K03) and the Swedish Agile contract attended the conference.
  • Agile contracts were used in large projects (up to €120M) by customers in Finland and Denmark.
  • Customers who have used Agile contracting in big projects have been really successful. We saw impressive results in one case: Danish Business Authority (a €60M program) delivered their projects on time using Agile contracts and at the same time managed to reduce service calls by 40%, case handling time by 69% and improve one time pass by a whopping 92%!

Insights and reflections from the conference:

  • Agile contracts are being used in large public sector programs in both Denmark and Finland. The Finnish Agile contract (€1.2 Billion) was a direct order from the Finnish Ministry of Finance and a precondition to get the funding. You can’t help but wonder why Sweden is trailing.
  • A driving force behind the adoption of Agile contracts in Finland is the tight budget conditions.
  • Time and materials contracts are not recommended for parties who work together for the first time. A target price model works better because it gives both parties the incentive to deliver on time.
  • Code camps where you develop a small part of a software solution together in 1 day, is the method of choice to learn about the provider’s maturity and skill level. It forces both parties to look under the hood which reduces risk.
  • During code camps and provider evaluation, the providers are generally paid time and materials for their participation. This is a fair trade between the customer who wants to find the best skill for the job, and the providers, who provide the options.
  • Legal issues are not a constraint to Agile contracting but getting the wrong lawyer as advisor is. The best choice for mid- to large-size IT projects is to create a small procurement team consisting of an Agile specialist, a software architect, a lawyer with Agile contracting experience and 1-2 customer representatives. This gives you the benefit of having software, legal and business /user experience and perspectives.

If you want to read more about the conference and including a short video summary – check out:

The conference was organized by Crisp & Nordic River (Sweden), Best Brains (Denmark) and Codento (Finland).

 

Slides from Agile Testing Day Scandinavia

In this talk I presented a simple 2D platformer written in Java/Groovy and how to use Spock to test it. I’ll make the source code available in a while.

By the way, of you’re not using Spock yet, then start!

Growing up with Agile – Minimum Viable Bureaucracy at Spotify

The Spotify ‘model’ was presented in 2012 and has stired a lot of interest in the agile community and the software industry in general. In May I was asked to talk about this a the Bay Area Agile Leadership Network meetup in San Francisco (where I at that time was working as an agile coach at the Spotify office): Since 2012 Spotify has continued to grow hectically. How has agile evolved at Spotify since then? Going back in time, and following the latest structural changes makes it clear that the model was never the primary mover: instead a number of core principles and ambitions has worked as constraints on how to grow the most suitable organization for the task, with small enough structure to help but not be in the way: you could call it Minimum Viable Bureaucracy.

Here’s the slides:

I also spoke about the same subject in April, at Agila Örebro, where there is a video recording of the talk (in Swedish).

Why You should attend ACPN 2016 (the world’s first conference on agile procurement)

Next week on april 28th, we’re having the worlds first Nordic conference on Agile Procurement in Copenhagen!

The line up with speakers is extremely interesting. We have real cases from from Denmark, Finland and Sweden where Agile Procurement and Agile Contracts has been used with successful results. With a lot of the cases in the public sector. Also, there will be talks about the Agile contracts and time to mingle and talk to speakers after the sessions.

Conference on Agile Procurement

Key Learnings from the upcoming conference on Agile Procurement and Agile Contracting on April 28th, 2016.

We are starting to see a shift here in Sweden where the public sector as well as the private are starting to procure with Agile methods, but the Agile contracts are rarely being used. This makes it difficult to get the benefit from the Agile requirements process and the Agile development. What I believe is needed to change this is to give access to real success cases within the same field, and to get the lawyers to understand and wanting to try the Agile contracts. This is what the conference is all about.

I hope to see some curious Swedish government agencies on the conference getting inspired from the many great success cases from Denmark and Finland. It can be done, and it will change the outcome of so many projects.

Join us in this great event and spread the word of successful procurement and development of big complex projects!

Book your ticket here, we still have seats left!

Read the full Conference description here >

12 seemingly normal things Agile people do

Last week, I got this great question from Faraz (a manager for an energetic customer support crew) who is experimenting a lot with getting more Agile. “What seemingly normal things do Agile people do?” I realized that we rarely talk about the small things that effective Agile people do. What makes a great difference is rarely the big sweeping change programs, but rather, the small everyday things we do without thinking about it.

So here’s a list of 12 seemingly normal things Agile people do which we don’t pay much attention to that can make a big difference.

Whiteboard problem solving

Agile Behaviours - Whiteboard

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Better meetings with the Core Protocols

Core Protocols Stack helps shaping better meetings

Core Protocols Stack helps shaping better meetings

Good meetings is very much about achieving deep collaboration. But collaboration is often hard. We go into meetings with different modes, intentions, and expectations. How can we make meetings both more fun and energetic? Surprisingly enough: maybe by being more formalized.
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#slowtofast podcast with Nordnet CIO Dennis

Hi!

I recently did a podcast together with Dennis (CIO Nordnet) on #slowtofast. I walked into the podcast thinking it was going to be about Kanban and Enterprise Agile. Right! 🙂 Dennis hit me with these simple questions..

  • The essential elements of proper Product Management
  • The management principles of an Agile leader
  • How the Swedish culture is beneficial for using Agile
  • How to get started with an Agile transition
  • How to make an Agile culture stick
  • How to handle failure

All hard questions, and all so essential to get right.  Here is the podcast:

If you are into Product managment and UX you’ll find more interesting topics in Marcus and Dennis podcast Slowtofast.

Cheers

Mattias

Design Studio – Power Method to Innovate and Discover the Solution

Today I held a Design Studio workshop with about 25 people at NetEnt in Stockholm. There where people joining in because they where curious, from all different departments. Perfect for innovation 🙂

Design Studio - The poster

Download the Design Studio poster as PDF >

It was just an hour, with a short introduction, starting with a warm up exercise to get their brains started up, and then 3 short time boxed iterations in 7 groups of 3-4 people. And then we had a 2 min presentation from each team on their combined idea in the team. Really exellent stuff!

A couple of the participants had done Design Studio before, but most of them had not. One of the participants said afterwards “When we got the mission, I had absolutely no ideas at all. But after just the first iteration I had plenty!”. Thats the way it works, you generate ideas and find solutions and see them from different angles as you work together.

The different groups came up with amazing ideas for future games on smart watches. Really innovative and cool 🙂

The Discovery Team

The Discovery Team

The more diverse your team is, the more perspectives you will see at the same time, and the better your ideas will be.

In the start of a new thing you might want to invite stakeholders, customer service, HR, marketing or others. When you do your sprints, you might pick some one outside the team to get a broader picture.  read more »

Continuous Discovery and Validation

Continuous discovery means an open backlog where everything is considered speculation and hypothesis. Continuous validation means that the user experience is validated for each release, rather than up front. This may sound like big budget to you, but let me give you a case study, about how a single team accomplished it on a tight budget.

A small team with a small budget has the advantage of not losing its head with big ideas from experts in different fields, be it architecture or user experience. The budget constraint sharpens your effort in a way that could be healthy even to a larger team.

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Agile @ Lego – our slides from Passion for Projects

Here are the slides for our talk Agile @ Lego at Passion for Projects in Uppsala. Enjoyed discussing this stuff with project managers and the like from all sorts of industries. A common theme from the conference was the power of self-organization, and the role of leadership in creating the right context for self-organization to happen. Our talk provided a real-life large scale example of this.

2016-03-15 Agile @ Lego Henrik Kniberg Eik Thyrsted Brandsgård

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The Candy Crush Soda Delivery Pipeline

Candy Crush Soda releases a new version of the game on all platforms every other week, year round. I’ve written about the delivery pipeline and the challenges the team faces on King’s tech blog: https://techblog.king.com/candy-crush-soda-saga-delivery-pipeline/

Screen shot King tech blog

Previous posts about working with the Soda team:
How We Developed Candy Crush Soda Saga
What Should We Build Next?

Using a delegation board to foster collaboration

I’m currently coaching a team with several stakeholders in different parts of the organization. It’s difficult to know who to talk to when decisions need to be made. The line between what the team can decide about and what the stakeholders need to be involved in is also blurry. To help create more clarity and a better collaborative environment with our stakeholders we decided to create a delegation board. The meetings we ran this week were appreciated by everybody, so I thought I would share what we did and what we learned.

Screen Shot 2016-02-18 at 23.21.43

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Kanban and Scrum – now with Polish translation!

The Kanban and Scrum minibook is now available with Polish translation. Great thanks to Zbigniew Zemla for the translation!

Pobierz tutaj (aka  polish for “get it here” ):

http://www.infoq.com/minibooks/kanban-scrum-minibook

Cheers

Mattias

Making sense of MVP (Minimum Viable Product) – and why I prefer Earliest Testable/Usable/Lovable

(French translation)

A couple of years ago I drew this picture and started using it in various presentations about agile and lean development:

Since then the drawing has gone viral! Shows up all over the place, in articles and presentations, even in a book (Jeff Patton’s “User Story Mapping”  – an excellent read by the way). Many tell me the drawing really captures the essence of iterative & incremental development, lean startup, MVP (minimum viable product), and what not. However, some misinterpret it, which is quite natural when you take a picture out of it’s original context. Some criticize it for oversimplifying things, which is true. The picture is a metaphor. It is not about actual car development, it is about product development in general, using a car as a metaphor.

Anyway, with all this buzz, I figured it’s time to explain the thinking behind it.

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Lean brädspelsutveckling från köksbordet – Att komma på och bygga ett brädspel

Att få bygga, skapa, designa och uppfinna har alltid varit något jag älskar att göra. Egentligen spelar det inte så stor roll vad det är, det roliga är att lösa problem, formulera vad jag vill, komma på vad som gör det bra, skissa och se att det växer fram något efter hand som jag inte kunde föreställa mig innan jag påbörjade arbetet.

Till vardags jobbar jag som kanske bekant för en del, med att coacha inom hur man bygger bygga digitala produkter, oftast Lean UX i Agila Team. Kanske är det därför det kliar lite extra i fingrarna i bland att göra väldigt fysiska produkter 🙂

HiFi prototyp efter några månader från The Game Crafter

LoFi prototyp
LoFi prototyp efter några veckor

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The importance of size and proximity

We have translated our blog on team size and proximity to english.

If you prefer to read it in Swedish it’s called Storlek och närhet har betydelse.

The english version you’ll find at Nomad8 site, because Jimmy Janlén is currently in New Zealand.
🙂

 

Lean UX i Agila Team – Sluta bygg snabbt, bygg rätt och snabbt.

På grund av att många försöker få med “allt” I en IT-upphandling, är det endast 40% av det som byggs som gör nytta i digitala tjänster och produkter. Lean UX hjälper oss att bara bygga de 40% i stället för allt.

Att arbeta med Lean UX är ett bra sätt att kunna identifiera vad vi behöver bygga, och prioritera rätt löpande. Men hur funkar det egentligen med Lean UX och Agila team?

Mina nästa kurser inom ämnet under våren 2016: https://crisp.se/kurser/kurstyper/product-discovery-med-lean-ux

Jeff Gothelfs kurs för managers i Lean UX som kommer under våren 2016: https://crisp.se/kurser/kurstyper/lean-ux-in-the-enterprise

Upphandling med Lean UX och Agila kontrakt för upphandling med minskad waste: https://crisp.se/kurser/kurstyper/certifierad-agil-bestallare

Vill du att jag kommer och föreläser på ditt företag, eller hos din kund? Hör av dig!

Continuous Delivery of custom WordPress using Vagrant, Ansible and AWS

Vagrant + Ansible + AWS = <3

Vagrant + Ansible + AWS = <3

The www.crisp.se website is based on WordPress, with a custom Crisp theme.

This is the story about how we’ve developed our custom WordPress theme, how we’ve made it easy for any Crisper and external consultants to work on the theme, how we’ve setup version control, continuous delivery, staging and production environments on Amazon Web Services (AWS). And how all of this is setup with absolutely no automated tests whatsoever.

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