One day in Kanban land

Here’s a really short and simple kanban intro:





Translations:

74 Comments

  • 1
    Mattias Tronje
    June 27, 2009 - 12:11 pm | Permalink

    Crystal clear as usual. Like the comic style!

  • 2
    June 27, 2009 - 5:10 am | Permalink

    Excellent!

  • 3
    June 27, 2009 - 10:42 am | Permalink

    Kanban limit of two (2). Good to know!

  • 4
    June 29, 2009 - 6:05 am | Permalink

    Observant readers will notice that the developers increased their limit to 3 a few days later :o)

  • 5
    Mattias Tronje
    July 2, 2009 - 8:30 am | Permalink

    Sorry – I laughed too much. Don’t be so funny if you got such an important message ;)

  • 6
    aa
    June 28, 2009 - 1:56 am | Permalink

    Excellent!

    Can we see comparison (with a similar comic) “One Day in Agile Land” please?

  • 7
    June 29, 2009 - 6:06 am | Permalink

    Which part of this comic was not agile?

  • 8
    June 29, 2009 - 5:54 am | Permalink

    So clear!

    Thanks.

  • 9
    June 30, 2009 - 3:13 am | Permalink

    Is the change in dev limit from 2 to 3 intended to signify anything, other than the limits can change?

    I generally think that reducing the limits is a sign of improvement as the team achieves better flow

  • 10
    June 30, 2009 - 8:35 am | Permalink

    The change from 2 to 3 was mostly to show that it can change. In this case to accomadate a higher variability.

  • 11
    June 30, 2009 - 6:37 am | Permalink

    do you mind I translate this?

    I’d like to share this picture with my fellow developers

  • 12
    June 30, 2009 - 8:30 am | Permalink

    Sure, feel free to translate it.

  • 13
    Anonymous
    July 1, 2009 - 1:17 am | Permalink

    A translation to Brazilian Portuguese:
    http://blog.adsystems.com.br/2009/07/01/um-dia-na-terra-do-kanban/

  • 14
    July 1, 2009 - 9:14 am | Permalink

    Great!

  • 15
    July 2, 2009 - 5:27 am | Permalink

    LOL, the truth hurts.

  • 16
    nickd
    July 23, 2009 - 5:21 am | Permalink

    I can’t work out if you’re for or against.

  • 17
    July 26, 2009 - 11:29 am | Permalink

    To be for or against Kanban would be as silly as being for or against staplers. It’s all about context.

  • 18
    Kunal Shah
    July 29, 2009 - 1:40 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the presentation, it a great one !!! But it has left me confused on one point. I know Agile and I know scrum but Kanban is new to me. I dont understand when the presentation says Scrum team Kanban 1 and then says Kanban team 2 and kanban team 3 on slide no 10. Can some one please tell me wether scrum team are different than Kanban? Id yes whats the difference.

  • 19
    July 30, 2009 - 8:44 am | Permalink

    If Team 1 calls themselves a Kanban team and Team 2 calls themselves a Scrum team, the only thing we know for sure is that they have different names. Other than that, the teams can be very similar or very different. I suggest you read the “Kanban vs Scrum” article, it should clarify things. http://www.crisp.se/henrik.kniberg/Kanban-vs-Scrum.pdf

    The slides you saw are mostly just pictures, with little or no explanation.

  • 20
    Anonymous
    August 26, 2009 - 12:46 pm | Permalink

    Have some of the slides disappeared? The Portuguese translation seems to have a few additional ones.

  • 21
    August 26, 2009 - 3:26 am | Permalink

    Oops, thanks for pointing that out! Looks I slipped on the keys when I added the link to the translations. Now the comic is complete again!

  • 22
    Anonymous
    September 3, 2009 - 5:26 am | Permalink

    Hi Henrik,
    This is great stuff. You’ve explained this as lucidly as one could get. Do you mind if I share this comic with my fellow developers?

    Thanks,
    Prakash

  • 23
    September 7, 2009 - 11:06 am | Permalink

    Feel free to use the comic as you like.

  • 24
    Mike
    September 4, 2009 - 3:26 am | Permalink

    This really reminds me of a fast food restaurant. That’s a good thing. Deployment is king because in-progress or completed food that’s not deployed is going stale and the customers are going hungry. No point taking more orders or preparing more food if the orders aren’t being completed. The prime focus has to be deployment and staff get moved down-stream to relieve the blockage and balance the system.

  • 25
    September 7, 2009 - 11:06 am | Permalink

    Good metaphor there!

  • 26
    September 25, 2009 - 10:41 am | Permalink

    Love it :-)

  • 27
    Anonymous
    September 25, 2009 - 11:46 am | Permalink

    What a grap, no beef, no point, again new buzz word for obvious well known old stuff

  • 28
    September 26, 2009 - 9:20 am | Permalink

    I wish you were right. I’ll sure celebrate the day this becomes “obvious well known old stuff” :o)

  • 29
    October 7, 2009 - 9:58 am | Permalink

    Here a french translation http://www.openagile.net/2009/10/07/un-jour-au-pays-de-kanban/

    With my Tux :)

  • 30
    October 8, 2009 - 6:10 am | Permalink

    Good work, added a link to your version above! Yours is prettier than mine :o)

  • 31
    October 10, 2009 - 11:53 am | Permalink

    Thanks for the link and your comment about my design :).
    If others are interested I can give my images in SVG (inkscape) format.

  • 32
    October 15, 2009 - 9:40 am | Permalink

    German version is up, thanks Arne Roock!
    http://www.it-agile.de/kanban-comic.html

  • 33
    Jooyung Han
    January 7, 2010 - 4:14 am | Permalink

    While introducing kanban, I showed this to them. They got the idea very quickly and enjoyed it. Thank you for great work :)

    (I’m one of the Korean translators of your Scrum and XP Book)

  • 34
    January 7, 2010 - 7:11 am | Permalink

    Thanks for your feedback, glad the comic was useful to you! And good work with the translation.

  • 35
    January 18, 2010 - 1:23 am | Permalink

    I have also a demonstration of Kanban coming and these I was planning to show as well. I’ve worked with Scrum and Kanban now for a year and eventually starting to get the big picture :) Your work has both helped and inspired me a lot and for that I salute you sir. Tack så mycket.

  • 36
    January 19, 2010 - 8:56 am | Permalink

    Great!! Innovative idea of describing Kanban.
    Thanks.

  • 37
    March 28, 2010 - 10:27 am | Permalink

    As usual, great material

    Always gets the point of Kanban across..

    In a recent presentation explaining CFD I used this alongside hour-by-hour CFDs showing whats going on. Available on http://www.slideshare.net/yyeret/explaining-cumulative-flow-diagrams-cfd

    Feel free to reuse!

  • 38
    March 28, 2010 - 12:31 pm | Permalink

    Awesome slides! Thanks for sharing back.

  • 39
    José Fidel
    June 10, 2010 - 5:19 am | Permalink

    Bastante bueno el comic. Gracias por ponerlo, así uno conoce más sobre Kanban.

    ok

    ATTE

    Fuy

  • 40
    June 17, 2010 - 2:53 am | Permalink

    This is great, of course, AND this is how I have always coached people to do Scrum. Work on one story at a time (max two) and the whole team work on outstanding tasks for that story until the story is complete. I can’t imagine why anyone would do otherwise. It would result in a loss of focus and a task-switching overhead.

  • 41
    June 17, 2010 - 9:08 am | Permalink

    In a Scrum sprint, would you be OK with not having a sprint plan, and instead having the PO add stories to the sprint on a just-in-time basis? That particular aspect is otherwise what I consider to be non-Scrum. Scrum, as I’ve understood it, prescribes that the team should commit to a fixed number of stories for a sprint, and not allow the PO (or anyone else) to change this during the sprint.

  • 42
    August 11, 2010 - 2:59 am | Permalink

    Appreciate it that you came up with the 2nd part of your squeezed links. I’ve seen One day in Kanban Land and its great.

  • 43
    May 10, 2011 - 12:27 pm | Permalink

    Thanks a lot for sharing the article on google. That’s a awesome article. I enjoyed the article a lot while reading. Thanks for sharing such a wonderful article.

  • 44
    July 7, 2011 - 2:02 am | Permalink

    2 year on and this graphic still does the wonders. Absolutely terrific. Nothings more clear :)

  • 45
    Anonymous
    August 15, 2011 - 8:20 am | Permalink

    persian here:
    http://www.hightech.ir/SeeSharp/one-day-in-kanban-land-farsi?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+SeeSharp+%28SeeSharp%29

  • 46
    August 15, 2011 - 5:42 am | Permalink

    Thanks for sharing! I’ve added a link to the Persion/Farsi version on the translations list above.

  • 47
    fredvandaele
    September 8, 2011 - 4:52 am | Permalink

    Thnaks Henrik, your comic is great to explain Kanban to others!
    Just note that the link to the french translation is broken …

  • 48
    September 9, 2011 - 3:54 am | Permalink

    Thanks for notifying me! The French link is fixed now.

  • 49
    Adam Michalczyk
    September 9, 2011 - 8:55 am | Permalink

    Very powerful!! Thanks for that!

  • 50
    September 20, 2011 - 1:47 pm | Permalink

    [...] Kanban-Board | Quelle:  Henrik Kniberg [...]

  • 51
    October 16, 2011 - 12:05 pm | Permalink

    [...] A visual representation of Kanban in action for software projects: http://blog.crisp.se/2009/06/26/henrikkniberg/1246053060000 [...]

  • 52
    Ali
    November 26, 2011 - 5:20 pm | Permalink

    Perfect:)

  • 53
    Ajay
    February 10, 2012 - 3:50 am | Permalink

    Can I use this comic to explain the concept elsewhere … Pls let me know

    • 54
      February 17, 2012 - 10:56 pm | Permalink

      Yes, feel free to use it. Just leave a reference to the original version, thanks.

  • 55
    Amol
    May 9, 2012 - 4:08 pm | Permalink

    Great stuff !!!, Looking forward for more pictures.

  • 56
    June 17, 2012 - 11:50 am | Permalink

    [...] Pour découvrir simplement le Kanban, je vous conseille la lecture de la BD d’Henrik Kniberg “One day in Kanban land“. [...]

  • 57
    August 16, 2012 - 10:10 am | Permalink

    Turkish version : http://www.kodcu.com/2012/08/kanban-ile-bir-gun-nasil-gecer/

    Thanks.

  • 58
    September 12, 2012 - 9:10 pm | Permalink

    [...] blog.crisp.se via Joachim on [...]

  • 59
    January 3, 2013 - 8:21 am | Permalink

    Thank you for awesome information!

    I translate Korean version: http://wp.me/p2Lc1y-3R

  • 61
    January 21, 2013 - 8:25 am | Permalink

    Nice pictures to explain Kanban, thank you! If you want to show what happens to flow with various work in progress limits and the (usual reaction) effect of putting more people in one ‘step’, we build a small simulator: http://zilverline.github.com/flowmulator/public/index.html and a blog describing why we build it: blog.zilverline.com/2012/09/21/flowmulator-a-kanban-flow-simulator/

  • 62
    Amit
    January 24, 2013 - 5:49 pm | Permalink

    :) Great Stuff!!

    Last slide was funniest when KANBAN limit exceeds to 3… LOL!

  • 63
    February 7, 2013 - 4:15 am | Permalink

    [...] second layer of my Agile Onion is Kanban. Kanban is the prevailing change method in the Agile world. It has a wide range of use, from a [...]

  • 64
    May 10, 2013 - 6:37 pm | Permalink

    [...] Pour découvrir simplement le Kanban, je vous conseille la lecture de la BD d’Henrik Kniberg  »One day in Kanban land« . [...]

  • 65
    July 9, 2013 - 9:46 am | Permalink

    [...] вышеупомянутых авторов есть замечательные слайды «One day in Kanban land«. Они наглядно показывают, какие решения каждый [...]

  • 66
    Aleksandar
    September 2, 2013 - 3:39 pm | Permalink

    Put some keywords dude, Its really hard to find this post trough google search engine

  • 67
    October 9, 2013 - 5:45 am | Permalink

    Hi, Henrik,

    I’ve just published Japanese edition here. http://lean-trenches.com/one-day-in-kanban-land/

  • 69
    January 24, 2014 - 8:05 pm | Permalink

    […] Schöner Comic, der das Kanban Prinzip in der IT erklärt: http://blog.crisp.se/2009/06/26/henrikkniberg/1246053060000 […]

  • 70
    March 28, 2014 - 3:53 pm | Permalink

    Should one move stickies backwards on a kanban board?

    I believe you have to understand or find the answer on “why it should go back!”. Is it because of a customer requirement? is it because something blocks it? Strictly speaking if you have WIPs in place and you get a blocking card, it may create a huge…

  • 71
    Robert
    April 17, 2014 - 3:27 pm | Permalink

    First off, the cartoon is really meant to illustrate a high level interpretation of the Kanban objectives.

    BOTTOM LINE
    This cartoon is pretty typical of the early development effort of many teams. Though I see only minor problems, I think there is a great opportunity for deploying best practices.

    PROBLEMS
    1. The development team hadn’t agreed on development standards. As a result, someone broke the build.
    2. Increasing the development Work-in-Process (WIP) limit from 2 t o3 (see last box)…
    a. Hides problems or constraints in the process, in this case a broken build or deployment process. The Team (capital T) has the impression that work gets done since after all more stories are being developed, but no value is being delivered since that only happens when a story is deployed.
    b. Adds little value early on at least because the Team (capital T) can’t even consume the first story or unit of work.
    c. However, it is reasonable to increase the WIP limit once the Team (capital T) can demonstrate that it is able to consume the
    3. Everyone rushing to offer help increases disruptions and puts additional pressure on the team when those involve know what needs to be done

    BEST PRACTICES
    1. Implement a Sprint 0 so that the Team (capital T) can iron out bugs in the end-to-end process.
    2. Implement development standards to reduce the possibility of new checked in code breaking the build.
    3. Implement ‘Continuous Integration’ to identify immediately when a unit of code breaks the build process.
    4. Implement an automated ‘Smoke Testing’ or ‘Regression Testing’ process to make sure that the none of the existing functionality is broken in the latest build. After all, why deploy a new build that takes a step backward in quality and functionality delivered?
    5. The Team (capital T), but usually the ScrumMaster in Agile, could have better communicated its problems and delays, in particular to the Product Owner (red figure) to better manage expectations

  • 73
    April 22, 2014 - 8:40 am | Permalink

    […] a situation arises, the priority is to clear current work-in-process, and team members will “swarm” to help those working on the activity that’s blocking […]

  • 74
    paltypusse
    September 11, 2014 - 1:58 pm | Permalink

    Never read something that clear. Heads up for explaining a not-so-simple concept, its advantages / disavantages without any tech word and in a 5 minute easy-and-fun-to-read comic.

    Congrats and thanks

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