Continue reading: Video – product development without the product owner

Video – product development without the product owner

Crisp’s Youtube channel has made a new release – introducing Concepts. Concepts is used to let passionate people run with ideas, a different approach than that of traditional product ownership. If you do use in conjunction with a product owner, it allows that person to spend more time on the field with customers. Ps: The

Continue reading
Continue reading: Vad du inte visste om LOU – Lagen om offentlig upphandling

Vad du inte visste om LOU – Lagen om offentlig upphandling

(this post will be in Swedish since it is a response to Swedish legislation describing how to sell and buy software. If you still are interested, Google Translate is your best friend 🙂

LOU – Lagen om offentlig upphandling Ă€r fröet till mĂ„nga katastrofer för statliga och kommunala mjukvaruprojekt. TĂ€nkt som ett verktyg för att hushĂ„lla vĂ€l med statliga medel, genom att konkurrensutsĂ€tta erbjudanden bidrar LOU tyvĂ€rr till att skapa dĂ„liga förutsĂ€ttningar för att lyckas med mjukvara.

Det knasiga med LOU Ă€r de felaktiga incitamenten: Om vi antar att de funktioner som Ă€r anvĂ€ndbara Ă€r relativt okĂ€nda i ett tidigt stadium av projektet sĂ„ Ă€r default practice vid anvĂ€ndandet av LOU att funktionerna skall specas i början och sedan skall billigast leverantör vĂ€ljas. Det vanligaste sĂ€ttet att jĂ€mföra leverantörer Ă€r att skapa en lĂ„ng lista av den sammanlagda funktionaliten i deras produkter och sedan lĂ„ta dem bjuda pĂ„ minsta kostnad. Inte ovĂ€ntat kommer vinnande leverantör efter kontraktet’s inskrivande att snabbt flytta pĂ„ senior kompetens ur projektet till fördel för junior och vips befinner bĂ„de kunden och leverantören i en lĂ„ngsam dödsdans dĂ€r kundens anvĂ€ndare blir förlorarna.

LOU innehÄller dock ett antal möjligheter som du som upphandlare kan nyttja smart.

Continue reading

Continue reading: Guest post by Ellen Gottesdiener: Exploring Product Options to Arrive at Right Requirements

Guest post by Ellen Gottesdiener: Exploring Product Options to Arrive at Right Requirements

When is a so-called requirement really required? And is it the “right” requirement? The answers depend on many facets: stakeholders, value, planning horizon, and so on. This article explores using options as a means to identify high-value requirements, at the last responsible moment.

My Requirement May Be Your Option

Product requirements are needs that must be satisfied to achieve a goal, solve a problem, or take advantage of an opportunity. The word “requirement” literally means something that is absolutely, positively, without question, necessary. Product requirements must be defined in sufficient detail for planning and development. But before going to that effort and expense, are you sure they are not only must-haves but also the right and relevant requirements?
Continue reading

Continue reading: Slicing cheatsheet

Slicing cheatsheet

One of the key challenges for any organization moving to a Lean flow is learning to slice bigger things to small. If you practice this long enough this becomes second nature and you stop thinking about how you do it.  The good news is this skill can be taught and to show the dimensions available

Continue reading
Continue reading: FörbÀttra frÄn start till mÄl

FörbÀttra frÄn start till mÄl

I denna video berĂ€ttar jag om vikten av att se till end-to-end ledtid och att den största förbĂ€ttringspotentialen hos en organisation med Agila team ofta ligger i  stegen innan utveckling pĂ„börjas. (for english readers: In this video I tell about the importance of improving end-to-end lead time –  not only think about the development portion

Continue reading
Continue reading: Guest post by Ellen Gottesdiener: Strenghten Your Discovery Muscle

Guest post by Ellen Gottesdiener: Strenghten Your Discovery Muscle

Here comes a new post from Ellen Gottesdiener who comes to Stockholm to hold her highly appreciated course Agile Requirements Analysis and Planning for Product Success.

In a recent interview in the New York Times, Panera Bread co-CEO Ronald M. Shaich talks about the importance of de­veloping an organization’s “discovery muscle” as well as its “delivery muscle.” Most companies have worked hard to perfect delivery—how they get work done—he says, because delivery “feels rational, people feel much safer with it, and you can analyze it.” But discovery—the activities you undertake to define or change your product, service, or market—is about “leaps of faith. It’s about trusting yourself. It’s about innova­tion.” The key, Shaich says, is for the discovery muscle to be at least as strong as the delivery muscle.

He took the words right out of our mouths. This need for balance between discovery and delivery applies in spades to software development. Our new book, Discover to Deliver: Agile Product Planning and Analysis, explicitly makes the case for equally balancing your commitment to these key ac­tivities. We define the relationship between them: In lean/agile software development, discovery and delivery are interwoven, interdependent, continuous activities (see figure 1). Each feeds the other.

Figure 1: Discovery and delivery are a continual process.

Continue reading

Continue reading: Guest blog by Ellen Gottesdiener: It’s the Goal, Not the Role:The Value of Business Analysis in Scrum

Guest blog by Ellen Gottesdiener: It’s the Goal, Not the Role:The Value of Business Analysis in Scrum

Ellen Gottesdiener

Ellen Gottesdiener is an internationally recognized leader in the collaborative space where agile requirements + product + project management converge. She coaches, trains, and presents to thousands of people globally and has facilitated hundreds of discovery and planning workshops across diverse industries.
She will hold her popular workshop in Stockholm 25-27 September 2013.

It’s the Goal, Not the Role:The Value of Business Analysis in Scrum

In agile development, what happens to the traditional business analyst? Consider Scrum, currently the most popular agile method. In Scrum, there is no “business analyst” role. In fact, there is not an explicit role for tester, project manager, architect, developer, data administrator, user experience designer, customer support representative, or product trainer. Instead, Scrum has three roles: the product owner, the Scrum Master, and the delivery team. Their collective goal is to deliver high‐valued product needs continually. So, where and how can a business analyst contribute?

Continue reading

Continue reading: Insights from Innovation games with Luke Hohmann

Insights from Innovation games with Luke Hohmann

I got the chance to meet Luke, the founder of innovation games this week. I find his view refreshing – humans are basically creative. We need to provide the platform for ideas to emerge. Some of my reflections after listening to the stories: It’s serious play, these games shape the outcome of of real products

Continue reading
Continue reading: Slides from SDC2012 – Modern product development principles

Slides from SDC2012 – Modern product development principles

  Just finished my session at SDC 2012 where I’m arguing for less hierarchy and economically aligned decision rules that  enables local teams to do tradeoffs.  Mary Poppendieck commented it as “traditional product management”.  Maybe that’s where we are heading 🙂 Anyway, here are the slides

Continue reading